Net Roots Movement

Lets Make Change.

Iraq: Over 115 Dead

A car bomb exploded today outside a medical clinic in Hilla, South of Baghdad. In and outside the clinic: dozens of Iraqi National Guard and Police officials waiting to take a physical that would approve them for service. The bomb killed at 115 at last count and injured 132.

I was lined up near the medical center, waiting for my turn for the medical exam in order to apply for work in the police,” Abdullah Salih, 22, said. “Suddenly I heard a very big explosion. I was thrown several meters away and I had burns in my legs and hands, then I was taken to the hospital

The bomb was detonated in a mostly Shiite area which begs the question: are the Sunni’s mad about the elections?

The answer: hell yes they are.

The elections were successful in further polarizing the Shiites and Sunnis. The conflict between the groups has pushed Iraq to the brink of civil war many times and the exclusion of this large minority in the new Iraqi council is going to result in large scale attacks similar to today’s and eventually into a full out war.

The US should have taken more steps to insure the Sunnis would vote but that’s in the past. Now, we need to find a way to integrate them into this new government to avoid conflict.

The Shiites say they want to work with the Sunni minority but judging by their reaction I don’t think that will be enough.

The Sunnis hate anyone who is helping the Americans (the officers at the clinic included) and will do anything to put an end to our occupation. We need to step up security when large numbers of unarmed Iraqi guards are present.

These poor people didn’t ask for this, as the occupying force it is our responsibility to protect them.

Source: MSNBC.COM: At least 115 killed in Iraq suicide attack
Car bomber plows into crowd of jobseekers in Hillah=

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February 28, 2005 - Posted by | The Progressive Movement

7 Comments »

  1. There are a couple of glaring inaccuracies in your post. Most notably, this comment:

    These poor people didn’t ask for this, as the occupying force it is our responsibility to protect them.While I totally agree we should do whatever we can to protect the civilians of Iraq, as of Jan 30th, the US is no longer an occupying force, and is there at the request of the Iraqi Ruling Counsel. It may be a bitter pill for you to swallow, but the US is no longer “occupying” Iraq, and it can accurately be stated that we are there at the request on the current ruling Iraqi Counsel. The fact that we helped hold the elections, does not change the fact the Iraqis elected people to rule them, and the Us is still in Iraq at their request.

    Also, another misperception you have is:

    The conflict between the groups has pushed Iraq to the brink of civil war many times and the exclusion of this large minority in the new Iraqi council is going to result in large scale attacks similar to today’s and eventually into a full out warFar from further dividing Iraq, the Sunnis, Shiites, and Kurds are working hard to get all the parties involved. The leading Shiite parties placed Sunni members on their ticket, just to be able to better include them in the political process. If you read the comments the Sunnis are making in Iraq, and not the ones reported in the MSM, you will see the Sunnis regret not taking part in the elections, and are working diligently with the Shiites and Kurds to find a way to be included.

    The people of Iraq have turned the corner. When the terrorists do their bombings, they are seen attacking Iraq, and not the US, and this fundamental change will make all the difference in fighting both the terrorists and the insurgents inside Iraq. Few Iraqis want to risk exposing themselves to save American troops, but when it Iraq that is under attack, you will quickly see the support for these groups fade. I have a much greater concern about women’s rights than I do about the insurgency. The people of Iraq will quell the insurgency eventually, it is the writing of the Iraqi Constitution that currently weighs on my mind.

    Comment by ÐÇRøçk§ | March 1, 2005 | Reply

  2. If the Iraqi council asked us to leave do you think we would?

    Comment by chris | March 1, 2005 | Reply

  3. If the Iraqi council asked us to leave do you think we would?

    Comment by chris | March 1, 2005 | Reply

  4. sorry for the repeat!

    Comment by chris | March 1, 2005 | Reply

  5. This post has been removed by the author.

    Comment by ÐÇRøçk§ | March 2, 2005 | Reply

  6. This post has been removed by the author.

    Comment by ÐÇRøçk§ | March 2, 2005 | Reply

  7. If asked to leave, the US would have to. There would be no other choice. If we refused, it would go against all we have worked to accomplish in the region. Now, that being said, I find it highly unlikely that the US will be asked to leave anytime soon, but if asked , i feel we would, the alternative would be devastating for the US, both politically and militarily. That being said, since the Jan 30th elections were held as promised, and since we have not been asked to leave, it is not factually correct to call the US an occupying army any longer. We are now an army that is assisting the Iraqi Government at their request, and this fact is not based on how the world feels about US actions in Iraq, but on the Iraqi Government’s view of the US military on its soil, and the world must respect their view, as it is their right to be the sole responsible party to make the call.

    PS.. sorry.. had trouble posting…

    Comment by ÐÇRøçk§ | March 2, 2005 | Reply


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